• BlackCapBlades
    0
    As a beginning knife maker I got some 1095 for my first few blades, I quenched the first blade at full thickness of 0.125" and no warp, but obviously much harder to grind down at that point, with the others i went down to a blade thickness of 0.04" and a spine thickness of 0.08" and had the next two warp on me pretty badly. All quenches with Park's 50 quench. So how thin is too thin before the quench?

    Thank you
    -Mike
  • Chop Knives
    57
    I generally only make kitchen knives so they are super thin. I don’t grind any bevels until after heat treat.

    I make go through more belts but I don’t have any warps that way.

    Also, wondering if you are doing any de-stress/normalising cycles before quench?
  • Ross Vosloo
    9
    like wise, when i do a chefs knife i dont lay in the bevels until after heat treat.

    my hunting knives or others i do i take to no thinner than 1mm, usually around 1.5mm to be safe
  • Smith Knifeworks
    43
    I work with 1095 and 15n20, I quench them both at full thickness. In my case, thats .125" for the 1095 and .100 for the 15n20. The 15n20 always warps at that thickness, but it's not so significant that I can't get it out. the 1095 is usually ok. Occasionally I'll get a slight warp (no more than 1/4" deviation from straight) but I can get it out. Any thinner than that and you're asking for a hassle. That's just the nature of the beast. I try to soak up a lot of theory, tips, the way others do it etc via youtube and IG videos. The guys in the " big fucking knife" world like Nick Wheeler etc all seem to grind to about .030-.050 at the edge pre quench, but you have to consider that a great deal of those knives have a substantial amount of metal in the spine of the knife even after they're finish ground. So, they have a LOT of support nehind the edge, even if it's ground thin. less likely to warp. Go look at photos of Nick Wheeler's bowies. Some of those things look to be nearly half an inch thick where the spine of the knife turns into the tang. Just don't go trying to compare yourself to Nick's work like I did. It'll make you want to smash your hands with a hammer and give up.



    The exception here would be plate quenching. I've heard some mention they pre-grind the bevel a little in stainless when plate quenching. I think maybe I heard Geoff Feder mention he does that? I could be mistaken, though.
  • BlackCapBlades
    0
    I’m making kitchen knives as well so looking to end up pretty thin, <0.08” or 2mm. I am doing 3 normalizing cycles and air cooling in between pre quench. I also was thinking maybe my quench tank is too small causing part of the problem? I’m using a vertical 24”x4” cylindrical tank at the moment. Thank you for the insight
    -Mike
  • JR Knifemaker
    27
    I tend to leave about 1.5mm at the edge and say 3mm at tip. I mostly get away with it...(!). Although I just inspected a bushcrafter that was ready for cleaning and handling and it’s warped about 2mm from true.


    I’m not doing any normalising cycles. Should I be even if I do only stock removal?
  • Josh Hiett
    8
    Normalizing is super important forging and stock removal. Some steels it’s more important some less so, but overall it’s a disservice to the owner of the edge to not normalize. #evenheat
  • Josh Hiett
    8
    I recently ground five 8” long chef knives .160” at the spine with a pretty aggressive distal taper to the tip, to .015” at the edge. I’ll repeat that, .015” at the edge. Normalized 5x then hardened and they were straight as an arrow. It’s really impressive what normalizing can do for steel and I can’t recommend it enough!
  • JR Knifemaker
    27
    Noted. I’mhalfway theough four pocket fix blades and they have all come out straight as an arrow. I’ll normalise next chef’s knife and see if it has an impact! This metallurgy business....
  • BlackCapBlades
    0
    thank you, I’ll give it a go with a few more normalizing cycles and hopefully that will take out at least most of this warp I’m dealing with
  • Josh Hiett
    8
    You’re welcome, of all the processes used for me normalizing is the most magical. It really sets the the steel up for success.
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