• Geoff Feder
    21
    Here’s the list I talked about on the podcast.
    I asked a pile of great blacksmiths, bladesmith & hammermakers if they only had one hammer to use what would it be. Feel free to add yours.

    The boys from @modernforge

    @SunsetforgeNJ 3.5 lb rounding hammer

    @JesseSavageblacksmith 2.5LB Crosspeen

    @CjDufton 2.5- 3 lb Crosspeen


    Lin Rhea Master Bladesmith he designed the “X-Rhea blacksmith knife”

    “ I prefer a 2.25 lb crosspeen in the old (1800-1850) pattern. As important to me is the handle length and shape. I make my own from kiln dried hickory. Mine are a couple inches longer than modern hardware handles and slightly slimmer than hardware store handles “

    Lighter hammer with a long handle give more quicker small hits more with more velocity for hand forging knives it make sense.

    Fred Crist
    worked at the Samuel Yellin shop for 11 years doing traditional blacksmithing as well as contemporary sculptor. His work and experience is broad and expansive

    “Geoff, as I don’t have a scale, I guess it is around 2lbs. But it is made by me, an angled cross peen with a square face, long handle. It was one of those tools that you make and it feels right to work with all day. Made it 20 years ago”

    The face of the hammer flares out similar to a Swedish pattern hammer

    Cross peen the fuller is side to side
    Straight peen the fuller is up and down
    A diagonal peen the fuller is at 45 degrees

    Nick Anger - 2lb Crosspeen

    Matt Paul of MP Knives-

    “2.75-3.25 lb cross peen, with a 16” handle. Subtle octagon shape to the face slightly rounded to the face 3/16”-1/4” radius on the edges. 3/8” or 1/2” wide end on the fuller, oddly specific I know…”.

    Radiusing or dressing the edges are critical. You prevent making sharp marks that a hit from the edge can make

    Jon Ledford - 3lb cross peen 1.75” square face with a 12”radius( that the measurement of the crown) 5 5/8” over all length with a 7/16” thick peen. 11 3/4” handle lenth

    Radius of the face concentrates the force to the center of the hammer giving you blows that move the metal instead of leaving marks. If you buy a rock hammer with a really flat face you won’t forge clean.

    Alec Steele - 3 1/2” lb. rounding hammer



    Brent Bailey
    “I’m still partial to the standard cross peen 4 1/2 lbs. I prefer the square face although I don’t use the peen much, I like the balance”

    Uri Hofi
    3 LB HOFI HAMMER
    THANK YOU GEOFF!! THE HAMMER IN THE PHOTO IS THE CAST HAMMER THAT FOR ME THIS IS THE MOST BALANCED HAMMER THIS IS THE ONE I FORGE WITH TOO. ALL MY OTHER HAMMERS ARE BALANCED TOO BUT WITH THE CAST I COULD DESIGN AND ARRANGE THE FORM TO THE UTMOST BALANCE THANK YOU AND NEVER STOP. IM COLLECTING SOME MORE JOKES FOR YOU BUT SOME ARE NESTY.

    Jake Faram
    Rounding hammer any day of the week. It is by far the most versatile hammer for general forging. I am in complete agreement with what Brian Brazeal says about them. Using angled hammer blows on a flat face yields the same results as a cross or straight peen. Granted you can’t reach in to nooks and crannies like a straight peen or cross peen but as far as movement of steel goes it works the same Its the Swiss army knife of hammers. Id pics a 3 lb hammer.

    I should mention that I like partnering up the radii of the rounding face and the form for drawing out tapers

    I know Mareko likes that big 5 lb. French pattern hammer

    And I’d go with my 3lb Hofi Hammer.
  • Geoff Feder
    21
    I get it I get it....
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